Liquidia Announces Product Development Collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline

Liquidia Announces Product Development Collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline

 

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC– June 20, 2012 -­‐ Liquidia Technologies today announced the initiation of a broad, multi-­‐year collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), which has acquired exclusive rights to research and develop certain vaccine and inhaled product candidates using the company’s proprietary PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-­‐Wetting Templates) technology. Liquidia’s PRINT technology is a powerful and versatile nanoparticle technology product development and manufacturing platform that is changing the way companies engineer healthcare products.

Liquidia Announces Product Development Collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC– June 20, 2012 -­‐ Liquidia Technologies today announced the initiation of a broad, multi-­‐year collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), which has acquired exclusive rights to research and develop certain vaccine and inhaled product candidates using the company’s proprietary PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-­‐Wetting Templates) technology. Liquidia’s PRINT technology is a powerful and versatile nanoparticle technology product development and manufacturing platform that is changing the way companies engineer healthcare products.

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Liquidia Technologies signs lucrative deal with GSK

Liquidia Technologies, a small Research Triangle Park drug-development company, has signed a transformational licensing deal with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline that could be worth up to several hundred million dollars.

Liquidia said Wednesday that GSK has licensed the rights to develop certain experimental vaccines and inhaled drugs using Liquidia’s proprietary nanotechnology, but the announcement didn’t include specifics. Liquidia said that a combination of payments from GSK -- including up-front money, research-and-development funding and milestone payments -- could amount to “up to several hundred million dollars” if all goes well.

Liquidia and GSK, which are collaborating on the drug-development efforts, are neighbors. London-based GSK has 3,800 workers at its U.S. headquarters in RTP and another 600 employees in Zebulon.

Liquidia was founded in 2004 based on the nanotechnology research of Joseph DeSimone, a chemist at N.C. State University and UNC-Chapel Hill. DeSimone founded the company with colleagues from UNC.

The privately held company has been nurtured by venture capital investments up to now, including funding provided by Triangle firms Pappas Ventures and the Wakefield Group.

“We are very pleased to have the opportunity to work with GSK, a company known for its commitment to scientific excellence, medicinal chemistry expertise and expansive knowledge of proprietary compounds that could potentially benefit from Liquidia’s...technology,” Liquidia CEO Neal Fowler said in a statement.

Liquidia has retained the rights to develop certain respiratory and vaccine medicines, as well as the right to use its technology to develop drugs in other therapeutic areas.

The company says that its PRINT technology -- Particle Replication In Non-Wetting Templates -- has the potential to develop next-generation drugs. For example, its technology is geared to deliver inhaled drugs to specific regions of the lung, which holds great promise for treating diseases such tuberculosis and cystic fibrosis.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/06/20/2148891/liquidia-technologies-signs-lucrative.html#storylink=cpy

Liquidia Technologies Inc. Studies Show PRINT® Engineered Particles Hold Promise in the Delivery of Respiratory Therapeutics

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Liquidia Technologies today announced the results of two newly-released studies that illustrate the unique benefits of the company’s proprietary PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-Wetting Templates) platform in the development of advanced respiratory therapeutics. Despite the high prevalence of lung disease, optimizing critical parameters of respiratory therapeutics to improve their pulmonary distribution and effectiveness has remained a challenge for the biopharmaceutical industry. These studies demonstrate how the PRINT platform can be used for respiratory drugs by precisely engineering particles with controlled shape, size, and chemistry, all characteristics that could lead to better lung delivery and therapeutic performance. Aspects of these findings were published in the Journal of Drug Delivery and presented at the Respiratory Drug Delivery Conference being held May 13-17, 2012 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Read the full article at BioSpace.

Liquidia Technologies Inc. Studies Show PRINT® Engineered Particles Hold Promise in the Delivery of Respiratory Therapeutics

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C.-May 12, 2012-(BUSINESS WIRE)--Liquidia Technologies today announced the results of two newly-released studies that illustrate the unique benefits of the company’s proprietary PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-Wetting Templates) platform in the development of advanced respiratory therapeutics. Despite the high prevalence of lung disease, optimizing critical parameters of respiratory therapeutics to improve their pulmonary distribution and effectiveness has remained a challenge for the biopharmaceutical industry. These studies demonstrate how the PRINT platform can be used for respiratory drugs by precisely engineering particles with controlled shape, size, and chemistry, all characteristics that could lead to better lung delivery and therapeutic performance. Aspects of these findings were published in the Journal of Drug Delivery and presented at the Respiratory Drug Delivery Conference being held May 13-17, 2012 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Liquidia Founder Dr. Joseph DeSimone Elected into National Academy of Sciences

Dr. Joseph DeSimone Joins Elite List of Scientific Pioneers
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Liquidia Technologies today announced its founder, Dr. Joseph DeSimone, was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for his excellence in original scientific research in the field of chemical engineering. Membership in the NAS is one of the highest honors given to a scientist or engineer in the United States. Among the renowned NAS members are Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Orville Wright, and Alexander Graham Bell. Nearly 200 living Academy members have won Nobel Prizes. Dr. DeSimone will be inducted into the Academy next April during its 150th annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
"Joe's scientific contributions across several diverse industries is nothing short of impressive and his election into the National Academy of Sciences is rare and well deserved honor," said Neal Fowler, CEO of Liquidia Technologies, "Joe's innovation and vision lie at the foundation of what we do at Liquidia and are the impetus behind a technology that is revolutionizing the development of healthcare products for a global population."
Dr. DeSimone is Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill and William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University. He is also an adjunct member at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. DeSimone has received over 40 major awards and recognitions including the 2010 AAAS Mentor Award, the 2009 NIH Director's Pioneer Award, and the 2008 Lemelson-MIT Prize. In 2005 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. DeSimone has published more than 280 scientific articles and has 130 patents to his name with over 120 patents pending. He received his B.S. in chemistry in 1986 from Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA, and his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1990 from Virginia Tech.
The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit honorific society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furthering science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Established in 1863, the National Academy of Sciences has served to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art" whenever called upon to do so by any department of the government.
ABOUT LIQUIDIA
Liquidia Technologies is developing highly precise particle-based vaccines and therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of human disease. Combining a deep understanding of particle-based drug development with breakthrough small molecule and biological therapeutics, Liquidia is engineering vaccines and therapeutics that have the potential to dramatically improve the quality of human life. In addition to its own products, Liquidia licenses its PRINT® particle technology and its GMP manufacturing capabilities to support proprietary programs advanced by collaborators. The company was founded in 2004 and is located in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. www.liquidia.com.

Liquidia figuring out how to ‘unleash’ technology

DURHAM – Durham-based Liquidia Technologies’ is working on developing vaccines using tiny particles manufactured as carriers of substances meant to trigger or boost the body’s immune response. The goal is to “finely tune” that response, and increase vaccine efficiency and safety, the company’s chief executive said.

But the start-up company could also branch into other applications with its technology, Liquidia’s CEO Neal Fowler said Wednesday. Speaking as part of a panel at the Nanotech Commercialization Conference in Durham, Fowler said the company has established a deal with Procter & Gamble for the technology’s use in consumer products, and could look into other areas outside of life science as well.

The two-day conference, hosted by the NanoBusiness Commercialization Association and other groups, was focused on businesses in that use nanotechnology, which is technology conducted at a very small scale – the nano scale.

Charles Hamner, chair of The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, a nonprofit research organization that’s based in the Research Triangle Park, said the business development using nanotechnology is still in the innovation stage of development, but he believes it’s about to enter the growth stage, which is the stage before maturity.

Hamner, who was also on the panel alongside Fowler, said he believes resources need to be allocated to help grow nanotechnology’s use. John Hardin, executive director of the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Office of Science & Technology, advocated for the government’s role in allocating public resources to help stimulate early stage business sectors like business using nanotechnology.

Hardin said has office has been pushing nanotechnology, but added that his office also been selected for review by state legislators that he believes will lead to reduced funding.

“(We’re) now at a prime time to support nanotechnology and its growth,” Hamner said.

As for Liquidia’s development, Fowler said the company is now focused on working on its “second generation” vaccine candidates – vaccines for malaria and pneumonia.

The first generation involved work on an influenza vaccine candidate. The company announced the launch of a Phase 1 clinical trial for a seasonal influenza vaccine in 2010, which was a trial that helped the company show the safety of its technology, Fowler said.

In February of last year, the company announced a collaboration with the international nonprofit PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative to explore using the company’s technology in the development of “next generation” malaria vaccines.

In March, Liquidia announced a $10 million equity investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for development and commercialization of vaccines and therapeutics with a focus on malaria and flu vaccines.

Then in December, Liquidia announced a collaborative agreement with PATH to do preclinical proof-of-concept studies for a next-generation pneumonia vaccine.

“We’re in preclinical animal models now, we hope to get to human in the not-too-distant future,” Fowler said.

The company’s board has also had discussions about other applications for the company’s technology, Fowler said, including spinning out one application, or licensing it for another, as a way to generate revenue.

“We’ve had a lot of discussions about the right time to do that,” he said. “A lot of other applications outside vaccines are at a very early stage,” he added.

The company now has a partnership “looking at a couple consumer products,” with Procter & Gamble, a company that manufactures personal care, cleaning, laundry detergents, prescription drugs and other products.

“Our challenge going forward is, our opportunity will be, how to pace those events to get the technology (going) faster and faster,” Fowler said. “(We) had to go through three or four years of understanding what we have on our hands, (we’re) now figuring out how to unleash it.”

The company could use its particle technology across an array of products, he said, speaking generally.

“The world is full of particles, (we could) produce things for diagnostics, consumer products, solar panels to green building materials,” he said. “We can use our technology for any of that.”

Liquidia CEO to Participate in Biotech Panel to Explore “How to Create 54 Liquidias”

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Liquidia Technologies today announced the Company’s CEO, Neal Fowler, will participate in a panel discussion titled “How to Create 54 Liquidias” at the upcoming Nanotech Commercialization Conference (NCC) on April 4th, 2012. The concept of the panel is to explore how North Carolina can further create opportunities and provide resources that will lay the foundation for innovators to build successful companies like Liquidia in the region. The NCC is the preeminent nanotechnology conference in the region and is being held this year in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina April 4-5, 2012.

“Through this panel we want to explore the opportunities that exist for our next generation of innovators and how they too can find success in North Carolina”

Over the next decade, nanotechnology has the potential to influence every aspect of our lives, including our energy, food, medicines, water, buildings, and much, much more. According to a published report by BCC Research, the market value of the worldwide nanomedicine industry is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 12.5% to reach $130.9 billion by the fiscal year 2016. The acceptance and application of nanotechnology to everyday products is a foreshadowing of the growth expected across a multitude of fields including medicine, devices, and diagnostics.

“Liquidia’s success continues to be a shining example of what is possible for startup companies that make roots in North Carolina”, said Jim Roberts, Director of Business Development at COIN, “Through this panel we want to explore the opportunities that exist for our next generation of innovators and how they too can find success in North Carolina”.

Chris William, Managing Director of the Private Client Group at Wells Fargo and Executive Producer of the PBS television series, Carolina Business Review, will host the NCC panel that will also include the Chairman of The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Charles E. Hamner, D.V.M., Ph.D., and Executive Director of the Office of Science & Technology for the North Carolina Department of Commerce, John Hardin. Conference details can be found at http://www.nanoevent.org.

ABOUT LIQUIDIA

Liquidia Technologies, founded in 2004, is a privately held biotechnology company located in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. By leveraging precise fabrication techniques of the semiconductor industry, Liquidia has become the only company in the world with the ability to rapidly design and manufacture precisely engineered particles of virtually any size, shape, or composition using a unique particle engineering and manufacturing platform know as PRINT®. This unique ability to precisely engineer particles enables scientists to explore new product frontiers that, until now, have otherwise been out of reach for the life sciences industry. In addition to the development of its own products, Liquidia licenses its PRINT particle technology and its GMP manufacturing capabilities to support proprietary programs advanced by collaborators. For more information, please go to www.liquidia.com.

Big Business Appeal of Nanotechnology on Display in Durham

 

DURHAM, N.C., April 2, 2012 - Starting Tuesday night with a speaker reception at the headquarters of the Center of Innovation for NanoBiotechnology (COIN), the fourth annual Nanotechnology Commercialization Conference will kick off with United States Congressman GK Butterfield in attendance.

The event, in Durham this year, features local, national and international nanotech commercialization leaders who will discuss topics such as how to grow this sector through university research, thoughtful regulatory guidance, corporate partnerships and increased investment.

The lunch keynote on Wednesday includes four heavy hitters from North Carolina and will be hosted and moderated by Chris William of the PBS show Carolina Business Review.

This fireside chat includes former CEO of the North Carolina Biotech Center, Charles Hamner, and now Chairman of the Hamner Institute. The discussion also includes John Hardin, the Executive Director of the Office of Science and Technology, who works with the NC Department of Commerce on science and technology policy. Finally, the CEO of a global leader of nanobiotechnology, and from our own backyard, Neal Fowler of Liquidia will discuss his experience and vision from the private sector.

The idea of the panel is how to create the infrastructure to create more companies like Liquidia that license technology from our leading research universities, develop the technology, attract investment capital, attract management and retain and attract the best and the brightest talent to the region.

Big business appeal of nanotechnology on display in Durham

DURHAM, N.C. - Starting Tuesday night with a speaker reception at the headquarters of the Center of Innovation for NanoBiotechnology (COIN), the fourth annual Nanotechnology Commercialization Conference will kick off with United States Congressman GK Butterfield in attendance.

The event, in Durham this year, features local, national and international nanotech commercialization leaders who will discuss topics such as how to grow this sector through university research, thoughtful regulatory guidance, corporate partnerships and increased investment.

The lunch keynote on Wednesday includes four heavy hitters from North Carolina and will be hosted and moderated by Chris William of the PBS show Carolina Business Review.

This fireside chat includes former CEO of the North Carolina Biotech Center, Charles Hamner, and now Chairman of the Hamner Institute. The discussion also includes John Hardin, the Executive Director of the Office of Science and Technology, who works with the NC Department of Commerce on science and technology policy. Finally, the CEO of a global leader of nanobiotechnology, and from our own backyard, Neal Fowler of Liquidia will discuss his experience and vision from the private sector.

The idea of the panel is how to create the infrastructure to create more companies like Liquidia that license technology from our leading research universities, develop the technology, attract investment capital, attract management and retain and attract the best and the brightest talent to the region.

The technology behind Liquidia started with Dr. Joe DeSimone and his team of researchers at his labs at UNC and NC State. The technology was spun out of the university labs, raised capital from local and regional VCs such as Wakefield Group, PPD, Pappas Ventures, and NEA and eventually the Gates Foundation. The company attracted experienced management such as Mr. Fowler.

Liquidia now has 54 employees and presumably some of the best talent in the world is working on this cutting edge technology called PRINT, where drug companies and vaccine companies are coating Liquidia’s nanoparticles with their drugs to attack fatal diseases.

So how are we addressing these important issues of a nurturing ecosystem to build nanotechnology companies and great jobs in the region? Several federal government leaders are coming to discuss policy. Several national investors in nanotech companies, including two leaders from Harris and Harris, a publicly traded venture capital, will present at the conference and there will be an investor pitch room - a tough love feedback session for early stage nanotech companies.

A former FDA executive will give a morning keynote speech after meeting with company executives at a VIP Breakfast. Another session addresses how to sell your nano product to larger companies and to bigger markets. Executives and VIPs from around the country have agreed to meet with our regional companies in hopes of making a match to bring some new out of region resources to our market at VIP Partnering sessions during the conference.

And to improve the appeal to the non-nano crowd, there will also be a first of a kind Nano Art Exhibition on Wednesday night, during the networking reception, where images taken from a microsocope have been enlarged and colored to show beautiful images never seen before. These images will light up Bay 7 at the American Tobacco Campus like no other event since the renovation of the old tobacco warehouse.